Land of the Leaves


#1

Just wanted to let people know that Land of the Leaves (a small digital museum I started for anyone who appreciates BeOS, Haiku, etc.) is still online and has been visually cleaned up to look a lot nicer. For anyone that had the old address bookmarked, I moved it to the new Google Sites, so please update your bookmarks. :wink:

I hope anyone who visits can enjoy it, and if they’re new to Be/Haiku, can learn more by visiting it. Thanks, all. Here’s a link to the renovated page for the interested: Land of the Leaves


#2

I like the close-up of the BeBox on the hardware page.

One suggestion - it would be great if the images at the top of each page were not so tall. In the current style, and a common 768 lines display, one has to scroll down to get to the meat of the page.


#3

Thank you for visiting (and for the suggestions)! :slight_smile:

Unfortunately, the new Sites only offers me 3 modes for the headings of the page, (i.e. just in case the clipping doesn’t upload: “title only”, “banner”, or “large banner”).

I wish I could find a size in between the size shown (like 1/2 of what’s currently shown) and nothing (title only). Maybe there’s a CSS control somewhere I can get to. I really wouldn’t want to turn off the images (as the pages look blank without them), but I totally understand the need to scroll down to read content.

Also, thanks for mentioning the BeBox! The image at the top wasn’t mine, so I replaced it with one of the illustrations. :slight_smile: If you like them, btw, the SVGs are available on DeviantArt. Thanks again for checking out the updated site!


#4

Interesting project, keep it up.

[whisper mode] I do not want to be angry that once again the BeSly knowledge base is not mentioned ;-).

Most of the linked articles can also be found here.[/whisper mode]

http://www.besly.de
http://www.old.besly.de


#5

Visited the ‘museum’ website and prowled through it…interesting to see the history and to see all the reference locations…good stuff and thanks.

…I’m sure there was reference to at least the old Besly web site cos I followed it and explored those pages as well.


#6

Limited flexibility appears to be the price to pay for ease of web site set-up from these recipe based frameworks.

I am seeing a lot more web sites requiring heavy scrolling to get through the content.

A quick look at some actual statistics ( http://gs.statcounter.com/ ) (I have rounded the statistics to the nearest 5%):

Device type: Mobile ~50%, Desktop ~45%.

Screen resolution: 350 x 640~25% and climbing, 1366 x 768 ~15%, 1920 x 1080 ~10%., other ~30%,

So, it appears that the recipes are beginning to cater more to mobile devices, which have more pixels vertically than horizontally. Shall all the desktops of the world, stuck with widescreen displays, unite in a web revolt about screen size assumptions?


#7

Yeah, websites have really changed (and are changing still). Everything is converging and becoming different. Visually, all one has to do is look at the Be website (link here), or my other favorite Apple from the same time and compare that to how things have evolved today.


#8

Thanks for the post. :smiley: I’ve added links to BeSly on the Media + Links page and the Hardware page, so it should get some mention now. :wink: Sorry that it was missing before.


#9

The evolution has been from emphasizing content over presentation in the older sites to presentation over content in the newer ones. This reflects a shift in perceived purposes of the web from /information sharing to advertising.

I had a bit of a laugh noticing that the main noteworthy feature of iTunes 1.1 mentioned on the landing page of the (old) Apple web site was its capability to support 25 third-party CD-RW drives!

Good luck with your digital museum!


#10

Hi, I only had a quick view on your pages, and didn’t find any information about HARP, MusicRepublic and Edirol:

http://picssr.com/photos/84822102@N00/interesting/page8?nsid=84822102@N00


#11

Wow! Thank you. I’ve looked at several pages, but there is definitely a lot for me to learn in this set. Hopefully, I’ll be able to add this to Land of the Leaves soon. :wink:


#12

I’ve added a link to the user’s original Flickr page (link here) in Land of the Leaves in the Media+Links page under the “Media, Videos, and Presentations” section and under “Historic hardware” in the BeIA section of the Hardware page. These pictures and slides were (and are) an incredible find; thanks for sharing it! Some of the BeIA devices mentioned I didn’t even know existed, like the Prius series! :slight_smile:


#13

Yes jeanmarc is a big BeOs fan too…
Is he still around?


#14

Well, actually, alongside my love for Be/Haiku, it’d only be honest of me to say I’m a huge fan of (classic) Apple and the Palm as well. And I do admit to liking and using Gnu(Hurd/Linux) along with the above trio. As for your question, I searched the forum and found this profile, but I’m not sure if this is him. I have to admit I was (and still am) amazed at all the Be stuff I found on his Flickr page – there is so much history there! :slight_smile:


#15

Thank you for this trip down memory lane. Seeing an active fanbase makes smile.


#16

It’s been a while since I’ve posted about Land of the Leaves. Is there any more info or stuff anyone knows about that I could add to the site?

I found a link to Be stuff, including the Max edition on a Be group on Facebook, so hopefully I can share the image on my site, since Be is defunct.


#17

IP owner allowed them to create and publish the MAX distribution.


#18

Who, Access? It’d be interesting to learn more about this story. :slight_smile:


#19

Okay, I know I’m bumping my own thread up the list— but does anyone have an answer to this question (about Max)? I’m still debating what to do with it. If it’s questionable to reshare it, I won’t.


#20

I remember the topic of the MAX edition coming up when the legality/legitimacy of Zeta put out first by yellowTab and later by Magnusoft was questioned by the community as well as by Access.

As far as I understood at that time, the MAX edition was allowed to continue. The individual publishing the MAX edition had asked Access which granted permission to continue do this. Permission was granted because MAX was simply a repackaging of the existing BeOS PE with binary patched bootloaders/kernels for some hardware.s I notably remember a AMD patch and a memory greater than 512 MB patch.