No one is talking about HP/Palm

Sorry, I haven’t been around BeOS for quite a few years now.

But when I heard that HP was buying Palm, a few Red flags were thrown for me.

Firstly, am I wrong in assuming that Palm still owned BeOS ?

As I understood it, they didn’t care about the whole ‘Open BeOS’ movement because they weren’t developing desktop systems.

If HP now own the BeOS IP, are they going to be more concerned about Haiku?

If they aren’t worried, is anyone lobbying them to release the original source?

Would releasing the Zeta source at this late stage in Haiku’s development cycle be considered a good or bad thing for the community?

-> And if I am wrong, and HP/Palm aren’t the current owners of the Be Inc IP, then who is?

Search for BeOS below for more information:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Access_Co.

I would say that Access Co. is still the owner of BeOS.

You should also search and read PalmSource & maybe BeOS on Wikipedia for greater information.

As I understood it, they didn’t care about the whole ‘Open BeOS’ movement because they weren’t developing desktop systems.

It doesn’t matter if they care or not, since Haiku shares no copyrighted work with BeOS. It only shares the API and architecture, none of which can be copyrighted.

If they aren’t worried, is anyone lobbying them to release the original source?

Releasing the source is probably not feasible. There might be parts of it owned by other companies, or covered by patents etc. It is also entirely possible that part of BeOS ended up in the Palm OS and webOS. Going through the entire code base and deciding what parts are OK to share or not is a gigantic task.

Would releasing the Zeta source at this late stage in Haiku’s development cycle be considered a good or bad thing for the community?

It might help a bit, but I doubt it would change anything fundamentally. Haiku already have most of the basics running. In many ways, Haiku probably is even more modern than the original BeOS, considering that a decade has passed since BeOS was last actively developed.

BeOS source code is currently owned by Access ltd. The BeOS source has very little value to Access. I spoke with a representative who said that although they are willing to entertain open sourcing parts of the source, like selected applications, they have almost no resources to review the source. The lawyers require that no 3rd party licenses are infringed by the open sourcing. So this is a stalling point.

There are some applications that would be useful to have. But Haiku has no need for any of the OS source.

Wouldn’t getting hold of the source code help in case anyone wants to improve BeOS compatibility? There are still a few applications that aren’t working that well, and actually seeing the source code rather than just trying to “figure out” what’s missing or wrong is probably more effective.

The Palm buyout at this point is irrelevant to Haiku now. Sad that it’s been mothballed, but irrelevant.

Although having some open-sourced apps, most of the code that AFAIK wouldn’t infringe on licensing would be irrelevant at this point. For example, I’m 90% sure that licensing would prevent the release of the app_server sources, but it doesn’t matter anyway. Haiku’s is missing a lot of hacks and cruft that the original had and has many more advanced features that it lacks.

Five years ago, I would have said differently, but Haiku is at a point where the only thing it really is missing that R5 had is stability. The sources don’t have much, if anything, to offer to Haiku.

Don’t get me wrong – I’m one of those people who was running R5 at least part-time from the time it was released in March of 2000 to just a couple of weeks ago. My primary development environment has been Zeta and even that is showing its age. The only reason I still run it is because Haiku just isn’t stable enough for me to use it for development exclusively. I’m eagerly awaiting the day when it is stable enough to use as a primary OS.