Mesa 22.1.7 on Haiku

Mesa 22.1 implements the OpenGL 4.6 API.
Vulkan 1.3 support on lavapipe

New features

  • d3d12 GL4.2
  • GL_NV_pack_subimage
  • Vulkan 1.3 support on lavapipe
  • VK_EXT_depth_clip_control on lavapipe and RADV
  • VK_EXT_graphics_pipeline_library on lavapipe
  • VK_EXT_primitives_generated_query on lavapipe
  • VK_EXT_image_2d_view_of_3d on ANV and lavapipe
  • VK_KHR_swapchain_mutable_format on lavapipe

Getting a near 2x-3x software rendering performance increase using Intel HD Graphics. This update helps in supporting 3D CAD, CAE, CAM, CAID, and other visualization software on Haiku.

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How software rendering performance and GPU are related? Software rendering do not use GPU.

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Also, 2x/3x performance increase looks like over-optimistic

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I don’t think this hype-making makes any sense, some of the listed features simply doesn’t apply to Haiku, or Haiku specific support code needs to be written to enjoy those features.
You can imagine it like you got the latest greatest phone, but your contract doesn’t include mobile data. You can flex with the features of your phone, but realistically you won’t be able to use most of them.
End of story.

Aside form the (not available*) new features, wouldn’t it make sense to update the package any way?

  1. “Getting a near 2x-3x software rendering performance increase using Intel HD Graphics.”

Before (hrev56387 x64, Mesa 21.3.7):
glteapot_slow_haiku

After (hrev56387 x64, Mesa 22.1.7):
glteapot_mesa-22.1.3_cocobean

So, a 5x increase in performance - based on this simple screenshot… well, benchmarks are what they are in this business…

As for features, there are many features in applications that many business/corporate users don’t use - but used by power users, hobbyists, enthusiasts, and developers. What is for you as a person is for you (and for me is for me). Let it be.

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Software is terribly complex nowadays. MESA is not different. Haiku being unlike the other major supported platforms and the fact Haiku supports (and can only support!) only a subset of the MESA features, the significance or the effect of a change for Haiku is hard to follow or understand.
Your posts however suggest all and every change in MESA affects and significant for Haiku, however it is far from the truth and could cause misunderstanding or even unrealistic expectations.

I did not meant me or you don’t use those features, i meant Haiku users are simply unable to use/enjoy those features as is. And most of those changes are irrelevant for Haiku users because the differences in the system.

If you don’t understand what am i talking about then try to explain, what the last point in the changelog means for Haiku users:
" * Intel DG2 support"

Intel DG2 is Discrete Graphics series 2 (series 1 is Alchemist, series 2 is Battlemage). Intel’s discrete GPUs have performance issues on Windows. On Mesa? Nobody knows but the Chinese because they get the early releases for graphics cards.

Thanks for the answer, but this is not about what that DG2 is or what kind of performance issues it have on windows, it is about the impact of this changes on Haiku, today.

For now? Nothing. Haiku’s experimental drivers are Radeon and integrated Intel.

Point taken - the 3D hardware accelerated graphic drivers on Haiku are not officially supported yet on x86/x64 (although, we have hardware accelerated AMD Southern Islands 3D graphic driver support on RISC-V).

As for Intel Xe and DG, See: ASRock > Intel Arc A380 Challenger ITX 6GB OC

You’ll also see user resells on eBay for the Intel Arc A380 cards.

There is also the Intel Arc A750 and A770 Limited Edition…

So, just a few months ago we didn’t have Haiku with 3D accelerated graphics on RISC-V or Haiku working (somewhat) on ARM… or Blender 3.0… or celebrities going to Mars… or electric cars for the blue-collar worker. Hopefully, we can keep in mind that one person’s trash is another person’s treasure.

The Intel Alchemist cards you mentioned only suck on Windows due to driver issues. The hardware is probably perfectly sound. Maybe one of these days Intel will figure out that the drivers are 70% of a graphics card’s performance.

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The majority of the reviews (as of today) deal with preliminary BETA driver releases - not any production release of the core graphics driver. The recent driver release, 31.0.101.3277, is still a BETA graphics driver release. The graphics driver is decent enough for a non-gamers or most corporate users. For the hard-core power user or gamer enthusiast, review commentary are mostly biased from the viewpoint of expecting production-ready driver and features for Arc A* products - in comparison to the competing graphic products (example: Intel Arc A770 vs. Nvidia GeForce RTX 3050 Ti) using production-level graphic drivers. Some GPU hardware releases have hardware bugs/issues which require another product release/revision. Nothing new in this line of business…

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