Attracting people to Haiku


#1

I dabbled with Haiku for some occasions in the past and seems to me like a OS with great future.
There’s no beta yet, there are many hardware constraints but there are also many things well-done.
I don’t know whether what I propose has been done or not.

What I propose is:

  1. To build a website showing, side by side, in tabular and clear form, what can be done in Haiku that is being done in Windows, Mac and LInux, regarding the several categories of software:
    Office, Multimedia, Graphics, Text editing…
  2. For video, graphics, sound and networking show what hardware is supported, what hardware is in the process of being supported.
  3. Since moving everything to a Haiku system is perhaps risky and not fulfilling for a vast majority of people, one can perhaps write how one can work in Haiku but have, for example, his files in other systems, i.e., telling if NFS, CIFS, and which filesystems for USB drives are working in Haiku (FAT, XFS, UDF, …).
  4. Show in what way a user (that has never used BeOS) can get the most of the filesystem, for example, with queries. Speaking of myself, I’ve read something about SQL queries to search the metadata of files, don’t know how it’s done, what alternatives there are, etc
  5. Idem for all other things where Haiku can provide a very good experience compared to other operating systems. Small things, small tips that amount to a lot when taken together.
  6. At last, creating some videos to show all the above

#2

You are free to help out. Start to create your wishes now.


#3

There are two articles by Scot Hacker which, although now dated, could provide ideas about how to organize the information:

BeOS: The 10,000-Foot View ( http://birdhouse.org/beos/byte/29-10000ft/ ).

and

Tales of a BeOS Refugee ( http://birdhouse.org/beos/refugee/ ) which could be a starting point for a Haku - MacOS X comparison. There were also good points about Linux (desktop vs. server) and Windows (monotonous user experience).
.


#4

In comparing operating systems, it is worthwhile to remember that “sometimes less is more” as Nilay Patel of The Verge described it when evaluating notebook options for his mom
( https://www.theverge.com/2016/2/1/10884918/i-bought-my-mom-a-chromebook-pixel-the-divergence ).

In essence, the operating system with the most applications and features may not be the most useful for some users.